2020 food trends: Foods predicted to be on the rise

  • As the year comes to a close, Uber Eats released a list of 2019’s most popular foods and its predictions for food trends in 2020.
  • Food delivery users are increasingly ordering plant-based food alternatives, vegetables, and trendy wellness food products like collagen and bone broth going into 2020.
  • Foods accelerating in popularity include Brussels sprouts, kale, cauliflower, and oat milk.
  • According to Jeanette Mellinger, head of Uber Eats user research, the service is seeing a “greater increase in socially conscious and health-conscious dining.”
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When it comes to late-night eats and food deliveries, a new report reveals that people are increasingly turning towards healthier or plant-based food options.

Uber Eats, one of the leading food delivery services in the world, just released its review of the most popular food and travel trends of 2019, as well as its predictions for what people will be ordering more of in 2020.

Food searches currently accelerating in popularity on Uber Eats include common vegetables like brussels sprouts, kale, and cabbage, but also more “Instagrammable” foods like star fruit and squid ink-infused foods. Plant-based alternatives like the Impossible Burger and oat milk are also seeing a surge in popularity.

“Over the last year, we’ve seen how important it is for people to feel good about what they eat and order, driving an even greater increase in socially conscious and health-conscious dining,” said Jeanette Mellinger, head of Uber Eats user research. “What started as a trend last year has become even more mainstream, with milk and meat substitutes gaining in popularity, and eaters looking to enjoy foods that contain added health benefits — like collagen.

“And while it’s always fun to see those eye-pleasing items — like starfruit and squid ink — take center stage, we’ve noticed a few veggie favorites are here to stay. Our customers continue to enjoy cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and Brussels sprouts, and given this healthful eating trend globally, we don’t expect those to go anywhere anytime soon.”